Devotional, Service

Motivation Monday

     And who knoweth whether thou art come to the kingdom for such a time as this?

Esther 4:14

     A certain day was appointed on which the Jews were to be destroyed and their property confiscated. Little did the king realize the far-reaching results that would have accompanied the complete carrying out of this decree. Satan himself, the hidden instigator of the scheme, was trying to rid the earth of those who preserved the knowledge of the true God. . . .

     But the plots of the enemy were defeated by a Power that reigns among the children of men. In the providence of God, Esther, a Jewess who feared the Most High, had been made queen of the Medo-Persian kingdom. Mordecai was a near relative of hers. In their extremity they decided to appeal to Xerxes in behalf of their people. Esther was to venture into his presence as an intercessor. “Who knoweth,” said Mordecai, “whether thou art come to the kingdom for such a time as this?”

     The crisis that Esther faced demanded quick, earnest action; but both she and Mordecai realized that unless God should work mightily in their behalf, their own efforts would be unavailing. So Esther took time for communion with God, the source of her strength. “Go,” she directed Mordecai, “gather together all the Jews that are present in Shushan, and fast ye for me, and neither eat nor drink three days, night or day: I also and my maidens will fast likewise; and so will I go in unto the king, which is not according to the law: and if I perish, I perish.”

     To every household and every school, to every parent, teacher, and child upon whom has shone the light of the gospel, comes at this crisis the question put to Esther the queen at that momentous crisis in Israel’s history, “Who knoweth whether thou art come to the kingdom for such a time as this?”

My Life Today, 64

Early Learning, Principles of True Education, Service, Work

Is Folding Laundry in Your Lesson Plans?

Training children to be helpers at home lightens the mother’s load as well as teaching children responsibility and diligence.

It can be overwhelming; a home to care for, meals to prepare, laundry, errands. Then there are the children that you feel convicted to educate at home. How do you get it all done?

You don’t. Meaning, YOU- the mother, should not bear the burden of “getting it all done” alone. Children are the junior partners in the home, and as such, must learn to take on a portion of the responsibility of keeping the family firm running smoothly.

God wants the children of all believers to be trained from their earliest years to share the burdens that their parents must bear in caring for them.” AH, 238

We as parents take great care in planning an excellent curriculum for our children, but often forget an important detail: True Education involves not only the head, but also the hands. Teaching our children to participate in the running of the household is just as much a part of True Education as is scripture memory, or nature study or mathematics.

Children and youth should take pleasure in making lighter the cares of father and mother, showing an unselfish interest in the home. As they cheerfully lift the burdens that fall to their share, they are receiving a training which will fit them for positions of trust and usefulness. Each year they are to make steady advancement, gradually but surely laying aside the inexperience of boyhood and girlhood for the experience of manhood and womanhood. In the faithful performance of the simple duties of the home boys and girls lay the foundation for mental, moral, and spiritual excellence” AH 288

Is there a simple task that your younger child could do with a little training? Sweeping, folding laundry, collecting the trash? What simple meal that your older child could learn to prepare independently? Do your children rinse their own plates and stack them in the dishwasher after each meal? Have you taught ironing so that your child can prepare everyone’s clothes for Sabbath?   As you consider your lessons for the coming weeks, remember to include lessons on appropriate homemaking skills for your children. True Education is educating the whole child.

The Saviour’s early years were useful years. He was His mother’s helper in the home; and He was just as verily fulfilling His commission when performing the duties of the home and working at the carpenter’s bench as when He engaged in His public work of ministry. In His earth life Christ was an example to all the human family, and He was obedient and helpful in the home. He learned the carpenter’s trade and worked with His own hands in the little shop at Nazareth…. As He worked in childhood and youth, mind and body were developed. He did not use His physical powers recklessly, but in such a way as to keep them in health, that He might do the best work in every line.” AH, 290

Sabbath, Service

Benefits of Ministering to the Elderly

 In our day and age respect toward elder people is not nurtured like it has been in times past. At least, that is my observation. (I’m not saying that I do a good enough job of training my children to say “Mr.” and “Mrs.” like I should.) Part of educating our children is to teach them to be polite and part of teaching them to be polite is teaching them to respect elderly. We are even admonished, “Teach your children to be kind and courteous to all, and especially to respect the old.” Review and Herald, Apr. 21, 1891

A great way to teach children to respect elderly people is by giving them an opportunity to minister to the elderly. Maybe you don’t know anybody who is elderly. Well get out your phone book. I’m quite sure that the first retirement center or nursing home that you call will take up any offer that you make. There are so many things that can be done for the elderly, that they will appreciate and enjoy. The children can make crafts and distribute them among the residents. You can put on a little program, either with just your family or you can pull along some other families to join you. If any of your children are taking music lessons, this is a great opportunity for them to play some pieces that they have been learning. Also asking the elderly to join with you on singing good old gospel songs always brings smiles to their faces. If nobody in your family or group is musical, that’s no problem, you can share some stories or scriptures or just be friendly.

For some time, we have been visiting a nursing home or retirement center once a month on Sabbath afternoons and putting on a little program for them. We share Scriptures, sing songs, play some musical pieces, say memory verses, share stories, give crafts and most importantly take the time to squeeze the hands and smile into the eyes of each person who comes to our program. This has just been a really neat service experience for our family. It has helped my children (and myself) to develop more sympathy toward others. Every single time, when we leave, I feel like I have been in the presence of Jesus. I’m sure that you if you give this wonderful service project a try, you will have the same experience.

Principles of True Education, Service

Motivation Monday

“There is no virtue in ignorance, and knowledge will not necessarily dwarf Christian growth; but if you seek for it from principle, having the right object before you, and feeling your obligation to God to use your faculties to do good to others and promote his glory, knowledge will aid you to accomplish this end; it will help you to bring into exercise the powers which God has given you, and to employ them in his service. But, young men, if you gain ever so much knowledge, and yet fail to put that knowledge to a practical use, you fail of your object. If, in obtaining an education, you become so absorbed in your studies that you neglect prayer and religious privileges, and become careless and indifferent to the welfare of your souls, if you cease to learn in the school of Christ, you are selling your birthright for a mess of pottage. The object for which you are obtaining an education should not be lost sight of for a moment. It should be so to develop and direct your faculties that you may be more useful, and bless others to the extent of your ability. If by obtaining knowledge you increase your love of yourselves, and your inclination to excuse yourselves from bearing responsibilities, you are better without an education.”

Christian Education, 246-247

Principles of True Education, Service

Motivation Monday

“There is no virtue in ignorance, and knowledge will not necessarily dwarf Christian growth; but if you seek for it from principle, having the right object before you, and feeling your obligation to God to use your faculties to do good to others and promote his glory, knowledge will aid you to accomplish this end; it will help you to bring into exercise the powers which God has given you, and to employ them in his service. But, young men, if you gain ever so much knowledge, and yet fail to put that knowledge to a practical use, you fail of your object. If, in obtaining an education, you become so absorbed in your studies that you neglect prayer and religious privileges, and become careless and indifferent to the welfare of your souls, if you cease to learn in the school of Christ, you are selling your birthright for a mess of pottage. The object for which you are obtaining an education should not be lost sight of for a moment. It should be so to develop and direct your faculties that you may be more useful, and bless others to the extent of your ability. If by obtaining knowledge you increase your love of yourselves, and your inclination to excuse yourselves from bearing responsibilities, you are better without an education.”

Christian Education, 246-247

Principles of True Education, Service

Motivation Monday

“There is no virtue in ignorance, and knowledge will not necessarily dwarf Christian growth; but if you seek for it from principle, having the right object before you, and feeling your obligation to God to use your faculties to do good to others and promote his glory, knowledge will aid you to accomplish this end; it will help you to bring into exercise the powers which God has given you, and to employ them in his service. But, young men, if you gain ever so much knowledge, and yet fail to put that knowledge to a practical use, you fail of your object. If, in obtaining an education, you become so absorbed in your studies that you neglect prayer and religious privileges, and become careless and indifferent to the welfare of your souls, if you cease to learn in the school of Christ, you are selling your birthright for a mess of pottage. The object for which you are obtaining an education should not be lost sight of for a moment. It should be so to develop and direct your faculties that you may be more useful, and bless others to the extent of your ability. If by obtaining knowledge you increase your love of yourselves, and your inclination to excuse yourselves from bearing responsibilities, you are better without an education.”

Christian Education, 246-247