Principles of True Education, Work

Learning to Work

Are we teaching our children to work?   Some of the best guidance I was given as a young mother was to teach my children the value ofchores practical labor.  They were not to be passive members of our household, but active participants in the running  of the home.   Training a child to work is about more than getting the daily chore list completed.  Useful labor is a vehicle for character development.   If a child is not taught to be diligent in taking out the trash, or making a bed,  the transfer of that trait into the academic arena will be the more difficult.   Work is also an important safeguard for our children.  What is the saying about idle hands?

Ellen G. White shares some important thoughts about work:

The physical as well as the religious training practiced in the schools of the Hebrews may be profitably studied. The worth of such training is not appreciated. There is an intimate relation between the mind and the body, and in order to reach a high standard of moral and intellectual attainment the laws that control our physical being must be heeded. To secure a strong, well-balanced character, both the mental and the physical powers must be exercised and developed. What study can be more important for the young than that which treats of this wonderful organism that God has committed to us, and of the laws by which it may be preserved in health?

And now, as in the days of Israel, every youth should be instructed in the duties of practical life. Each should acquire a knowledge of some branch of manual labor by which, if need be, he may obtain a livelihood. This is essential, not only as a safeguard against the vicissitudes of life, but from its bearing upon physical, mental, and moral development. Even if it were certain that one would never need to resort to manual labor for his support, still he should be taught to work. Without physical exercise, no one can have a sound constitution and vigorous health; and the discipline of well-regulated labor is no less essential to the securing of a strong and active mind and a noble character.

Every student should devote a portion of each day to active labor. Thus habits of industry would be formed and a spirit of self-reliance encouraged, while the youth would be shielded from many evil and degrading practices that are so often the result of idleness. And this is all in keeping with the primary object of education, for in encouraging activity, diligence, and purity we are coming into harmony with the Creator.

Patriarchs and Prophets, 601

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